Page 347 of 347

Re: Theo Walcott

PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2020 12:58 pm
by Phil71
Power n Glory wrote:
Phil71 wrote:
Power n Glory wrote:
Ach wrote:
Alan Hansen has admitted to one regret during his time as a pundit, but it is not for the comment that most famously haunted him.

The Match of the Day analyst ended his 22 year career with the BBC after the World Cup, making his last match the final between Germany and Argentina.

Over such a long period of time inevitably mistakes were made but Hansen has only one regret from his career analysing matches. But it wasn't his claim that you cannot win anything with kids, a view rubbished when the Manchester United team he was talking about went on to carry the Red Devils through the most glorious years in the club's history.

The former Liverpool defender revealed in his column for The Telegraph that it was his criticism of Theo Walcott that troubled him.

"Four years ago, I said that Theo Walcott did not have a "football brain", without realising that my comments would be misinterpreted to such an extent," he wrote in his column.

"The meaning of my observation was not as brutal as it may have come across, but nonetheless, I was critical of Walcott’s ability and I am pleased to say that Theo has proved me wrong one million per cent."

Hansen went on to reveal that he and Walcott have met since and there has not been a problem between them whilst conceding his comments were "the only time that I have ever been happy to be wrong".


https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/foo ... 08074.html

He realised he was clearly wrong and thatsbfair enough. Unfortunately it stuck and people were mocked cos of it by myself and others who understands football.


Thank you. It was utter rubbish and the guy that said has even admitted Walcott has proven his wrong time and time again. I can't stand the way our own fans latched on to this rubbish.


He's a 2nd rate player like all the 2nd rate players we've had in the past 10-15 years.

The fact that he' not good enough for Everton and is on loan at Southampton is testament to that.


I don't care where you rate Theo as a player. He'll divide opinion. I liked him despite the limitations and he was good servant to the club.

The issue here is 'footballing intelligence' and how that phrase was thrown around to berate one of our own. Hansen has admitted he was wrong and was proven wrong by Theo on many occasions. As Ach said, most fans are just sheep and went along with it and didn't stop to assess things for themselves.


I don't even remember Hansen saying those things. I made my own mind up about Walcott.

He's not a natural thinker on the pitch, and mentally is not on the same level as naturally intelligent players that we've had over the years like Wright, Henry, Bergkamp, Pires, Adams, Campbell, Ozil and others - top rate players who just know where to position themselves at which times and what another player is going to do - be they our players or the opposition's.

I'm not doubting his service to the club. All I'm saying is he wasn't a good enough player if we wanted to win anything big. Neither were a lot of players we've had in the past 10 years and more. Second rate.

Re: Theo Walcott

PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2020 1:06 pm
by Ach
Power n Glory wrote:
Phil71 wrote:
Power n Glory wrote:
Ach wrote:
Alan Hansen has admitted to one regret during his time as a pundit, but it is not for the comment that most famously haunted him.

The Match of the Day analyst ended his 22 year career with the BBC after the World Cup, making his last match the final between Germany and Argentina.

Over such a long period of time inevitably mistakes were made but Hansen has only one regret from his career analysing matches. But it wasn't his claim that you cannot win anything with kids, a view rubbished when the Manchester United team he was talking about went on to carry the Red Devils through the most glorious years in the club's history.

The former Liverpool defender revealed in his column for The Telegraph that it was his criticism of Theo Walcott that troubled him.

"Four years ago, I said that Theo Walcott did not have a "football brain", without realising that my comments would be misinterpreted to such an extent," he wrote in his column.

"The meaning of my observation was not as brutal as it may have come across, but nonetheless, I was critical of Walcott’s ability and I am pleased to say that Theo has proved me wrong one million per cent."

Hansen went on to reveal that he and Walcott have met since and there has not been a problem between them whilst conceding his comments were "the only time that I have ever been happy to be wrong".


https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/foo ... 08074.html

He realised he was clearly wrong and thatsbfair enough. Unfortunately it stuck and people were mocked cos of it by myself and others who understands football.


Thank you. It was utter rubbish and the guy that said has even admitted Walcott has proven his wrong time and time again. I can't stand the way our own fans latched on to this rubbish.


He's a 2nd rate player like all the 2nd rate players we've had in the past 10-15 years.

The fact that he' not good enough for Everton and is on loan at Southampton is testament to that.


I don't care where you rate Theo as a player. He'll divide opinion. I liked him despite the limitations and he was good servant to the club.

The issue here is 'footballing intelligence' and how that phrase was thrown around to berate one of our own. Hansen has admitted he was wrong and was proven wrong by Theo on many occasions. As Ach said, most fans are just sheep and went along with it and didn't stop to assess things for themselves.

Re: Theo Walcott

PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2020 2:16 pm
by Power n Glory
Phil71 wrote:
Power n Glory wrote:
Phil71 wrote:
Power n Glory wrote:
Ach wrote:
Alan Hansen has admitted to one regret during his time as a pundit, but it is not for the comment that most famously haunted him.

The Match of the Day analyst ended his 22 year career with the BBC after the World Cup, making his last match the final between Germany and Argentina.

Over such a long period of time inevitably mistakes were made but Hansen has only one regret from his career analysing matches. But it wasn't his claim that you cannot win anything with kids, a view rubbished when the Manchester United team he was talking about went on to carry the Red Devils through the most glorious years in the club's history.

The former Liverpool defender revealed in his column for The Telegraph that it was his criticism of Theo Walcott that troubled him.

"Four years ago, I said that Theo Walcott did not have a "football brain", without realising that my comments would be misinterpreted to such an extent," he wrote in his column.

"The meaning of my observation was not as brutal as it may have come across, but nonetheless, I was critical of Walcott’s ability and I am pleased to say that Theo has proved me wrong one million per cent."

Hansen went on to reveal that he and Walcott have met since and there has not been a problem between them whilst conceding his comments were "the only time that I have ever been happy to be wrong".


https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/foo ... 08074.html

He realised he was clearly wrong and thatsbfair enough. Unfortunately it stuck and people were mocked cos of it by myself and others who understands football.


Thank you. It was utter rubbish and the guy that said has even admitted Walcott has proven his wrong time and time again. I can't stand the way our own fans latched on to this rubbish.


He's a 2nd rate player like all the 2nd rate players we've had in the past 10-15 years.

The fact that he' not good enough for Everton and is on loan at Southampton is testament to that.


I don't care where you rate Theo as a player. He'll divide opinion. I liked him despite the limitations and he was good servant to the club.

The issue here is 'footballing intelligence' and how that phrase was thrown around to berate one of our own. Hansen has admitted he was wrong and was proven wrong by Theo on many occasions. As Ach said, most fans are just sheep and went along with it and didn't stop to assess things for themselves.


I don't even remember Hansen saying those things. I made my own mind up about Walcott.

He's not a natural thinker on the pitch, and mentally is not on the same level as naturally intelligent players that we've had over the years like Wright, Henry, Bergkamp, Pires, Adams, Campbell, Ozil and others - top rate players who just know where to position themselves at which times and what another player is going to do - be they our players or the opposition's.

I'm not doubting his service to the club. All I'm saying is he wasn't a good enough player if we wanted to win anything big. Neither were a lot of players we've had in the past 10 years and more. Second rate.


I remember when Chris Waddle said it and how often it was repeated after. I also remember Wrighty's strong defence of Walcott and Wenger constantly talking up Theo's intelligent movement off the ball.

You don't score that amount of goals without having some form of footballing intelligence. He's one of our top goal scorers of all time and he's a winger. His movement, anticipation, reading of the game has to be sharp in order to be in position to score. He played like a number 9, penalty box striker but because of his small stature and pace, he was played out on the wings which always meant he'd be judged on his skillset as a winger instead of his skillset as a striker. If he were over 6 foot, he'd have been developed as a number 9 striker instead of winger.

How exactly do you quantify 'natural intelligence' in a footballer and a 'natural thinker'? How are you able to see what they're thinking? You should check for Bergkamp's interviews where he talks though his goals or any player just talking about the goals they've scored. It's just speed of thought, reacting and having the actual technique to pull it off. Sometimes, they struggle to explain it themselves and it's just instinct and reacting as a situation develops.

Re: Theo Walcott

PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2020 2:57 pm
by Power n Glory
https://www.fourfourtwo.com/amp/features/dennis-bergkamp-newcastle-goal-2002-arsenal-meant-it-premier-league

Bergkamp talking through his Newcastle goal.

“The week after that goal, ‘Did you really mean it?’ was the question everyone was asking me,” Bergkamp told FFT.

“I couldn’t understand what people meant by the question. I didn’t see the goal on television for several days, and so many people were asking me that I thought, ‘OK, I have to see what they saw’.
“I watched it back, and then I could understand what they meant.

"The pass from Pires was slightly behind me and I was adjusting myself to the situation, because I wanted to go through on goal with one touch. I touched the ball, but my body was already turning the other way, so it looked quite good!

“For many goals, players just decide at the last moment what they’re going to do. That was the same with me. I’m glad it looked like that, and that everyone is still talking about it today
.”

Re: Theo Walcott

PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2020 4:13 pm
by Nuggets
Power n Glory wrote:https://www.fourfourtwo.com/amp/features/dennis-bergkamp-newcastle-goal-2002-arsenal-meant-it-premier-league

Bergkamp talking through his Newcastle goal.

“The week after that goal, ‘Did you really mean it?’ was the question everyone was asking me,” Bergkamp told FFT.

“I couldn’t understand what people meant by the question. I didn’t see the goal on television for several days, and so many people were asking me that I thought, ‘OK, I have to see what they saw’.
“I watched it back, and then I could understand what they meant.

"The pass from Pires was slightly behind me and I was adjusting myself to the situation, because I wanted to go through on goal with one touch. I touched the ball, but my body was already turning the other way, so it looked quite good!

“For many goals, players just decide at the last moment what they’re going to do. That was the same with me. I’m glad it looked like that, and that everyone is still talking about it today
.”


Now that's what you call a legend, that was a sublime goal, we won't see this likes of that from this lot that's for sure.