Rap/Hip-Hop 1979-1999

Re: Rap/Hip-Hop 1979-1999

Postby LMAO » Thu Jan 19, 2017 7:12 am

StLGooner wrote:
Pudpop wrote:
StLGooner wrote:Nobody is doing anything new.


:think:

This just isn't true mate. I'm fine with people preferring old school rap and saying it's better but to say that there's nothing new means you aren't actually looking hard enough.



Well it's a opinion of course, so nobody is wrong or right, but creatively it seems to be all the same or just not any good, in my opinion of course. And of course when I say nobody in this sense it means not a many.


You have a point.

It's a different breed nowadays than it was in hip-hop's golden age. Not saying it's any worse, only that I prefer the storytelling, flow, and beats of the old school better than much of the new school stuff. For current rappers who are relatively recent, really only Kendrick Lamar, Joey Bada$$, and Mac Miller (I would also say Anderson .Paak, but he's much more than a rapper) stand out for me for how they've taken the old school and updated it for the current era.

But, there are still good rappers with the new school sound like Logic and Chance the Rapper.

I can't see anyone who listens to hip-hop not having heard a Kendrick song, so I won't recommend him. I think you should give Joey Bada$$ a listen, though, if you haven't heard him before.


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Re: Rap/Hip-Hop 1979-1999

Postby StLGooner » Thu Jan 19, 2017 2:13 pm

Brandon wrote:
StLGooner wrote:
Pudpop wrote:
StLGooner wrote:Nobody is doing anything new.


:think:

This just isn't true mate. I'm fine with people preferring old school rap and saying it's better but to say that there's nothing new means you aren't actually looking hard enough.



Well it's a opinion of course, so nobody is wrong or right, but creatively it seems to be all the same or just not any good, in my opinion of course. And of course when I say nobody in this sense it means not a many.


You have a point.

It's a different breed nowadays than it was in hip-hop's golden age. Not saying it's any worse, only that I prefer the storytelling, flow, and beats of the old school better than much of the new school stuff. For current rappers who are relatively recent, really only Kendrick Lamar, Joey Bada$$, and Mac Miller (I would also say Anderson .Paak, but he's much more than a rapper) stand out for me for how they've taken the old school and updated it for the current era.

But, there are still good rappers with the new school sound like Logic and Chance the Rapper.

I can't see anyone who listens to hip-hop not having heard a Kendrick song, so I won't recommend him. I think you should give Joey Bada$$ a listen, though, if you haven't heard him before.




For sure, will do.

But you're right it's about what sounds good to your ears and what stimulates you lyrically. But Pudpop had a good point as well, I probably just haven't searched hard enough for the good stuff. But that's because I'm not used to having to search for the good stuff. There seem to be so many different artist these days and the bad ones aren't getting weeded out, instead they're becoming popular.
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Re: Rap/Hip-Hop 1979-1999

Postby Pudpop » Thu Jan 19, 2017 2:35 pm

StLGooner wrote:
Brandon wrote:
StLGooner wrote:
Pudpop wrote:
StLGooner wrote:Nobody is doing anything new.


:think:

This just isn't true mate. I'm fine with people preferring old school rap and saying it's better but to say that there's nothing new means you aren't actually looking hard enough.



Well it's a opinion of course, so nobody is wrong or right, but creatively it seems to be all the same or just not any good, in my opinion of course. And of course when I say nobody in this sense it means not a many.


You have a point.

It's a different breed nowadays than it was in hip-hop's golden age. Not saying it's any worse, only that I prefer the storytelling, flow, and beats of the old school better than much of the new school stuff. For current rappers who are relatively recent, really only Kendrick Lamar, Joey Bada$$, and Mac Miller (I would also say Anderson .Paak, but he's much more than a rapper) stand out for me for how they've taken the old school and updated it for the current era.

But, there are still good rappers with the new school sound like Logic and Chance the Rapper.

I can't see anyone who listens to hip-hop not having heard a Kendrick song, so I won't recommend him. I think you should give Joey Bada$$ a listen, though, if you haven't heard him before.




For sure, will do.

But you're right it's about what sounds good to your ears and what stimulates you lyrically. But Pudpop had a good point as well, I probably just haven't searched hard enough for the good stuff. But that's because I'm not used to having to search for the good stuff. There seem to be so many different artist these days and the bad ones aren't getting weeded out, instead they're becoming popular.


That's very true. At the same time what is awesome about these days is that there is just so much out there. There'll be artists on youtube with 30-50k views but they sound great and no-one's heard of them. I'm not old enough to have lived through the vinyl years but I suspect that stumbling onto an unknown artist you like on the internet is like finding an unknown vinyl at a record store and it becoming one of your favourites. Imo, sometimes just searching for the artists you like is half the fun.
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Re: Rap/Hip-Hop 1979-1999

Postby Zenith » Fri Mar 10, 2017 5:16 pm

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Re: Rap/Hip-Hop 1979-1999

Postby Va-Va-Voom » Sun Apr 16, 2017 8:09 pm

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Re: Rap/Hip-Hop 1979-1999

Postby Zenith » Thu Oct 12, 2017 5:38 pm


Pro:Verbs, also known as Sunrise.

Recorded in 1995, albeit stayed unreleased until 2009.

If you have solid cans and can appreciate a beat, you're in for a treat.
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Re: Rap/Hip-Hop 1979-1999

Postby LMAO » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:47 am



My workout playlist has been hella 90s hip-hop for the past couple weeks.

On a side note: I really need to watch Friday again—such a classic.
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Re: Rap/Hip-Hop 1979-1999

Postby Zenith » Sat Sep 15, 2018 2:23 am

The Dopest Photo In Hip-Hop: The Paid in Full Posse

Ready for another story? Fans of Eric B & Rakim will especially love this one. This time we are going to inspect the back cover of their classic ‘Paid in Full’ album, which is arguably the greatest photo in hip-hop, period. The street legends pictured are the originators of what hip-hop fashion is known to be today.

This collection of ultra-fly characters is comprised of the most infamous hustlers, rappers and gangsters of the mid-1980’s - meet the Paid in Full Posse or Supreme Team (Fort Greene, Brooklyn). You could say the whole ‘rapper’ image was inspired by these very hustlers who had more money and power at age 15 than most do their entire lives. Meet the posse:

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Eric B. (in front, hands clasped): Was both a respected street guy and savvy businessman. Not much of a DJ though, so you could say he was the first Suge Knight or Puff Daddy in the rap game. Was very well connected and feared by many.

Rakim (middle row, second from right): The OG lyrical wordsmith (listen to him on our hip-hop playlist titled Lyrical Masterpieces). Arguably the greatest and most influential rapper of all time - you bet he was surrounded by some of the gooniest goons that have walked on this planet.

Kool G Rap (right of Rakim): Closely affiliated with the crew before he was famous. Was once chased out of New York by Eric B and the very goons in this picture after he revealed Large Professor (from Main Source) ghost-produced most of the beats on the Eric B & Rakim albums.

50 Cent (crouching in red hat): a 5’2” stickup kid weighing in at 120 pounds who was known to rob you for as little as 50 cents. An infamous gunslinger and is the very man who inspired G-Unit’s 50 Cent to adopt his moniker. His stories include robbing LL Cool J’s chain at a White Castle, jacking Whodini and having a shoot-out with Jam Master Jay’s crew. He was shot on October 20, 1987 on the stairway of his girlfriend's project building, dying in Kings County Hospital 4 days later.

Rap (top left): He’s the guy in the FILA tracksuit and dookie chains on the top left. He’s brother to Supreme Majestic, the leader of the crew.

Killer Ben (top in green): The guy on the top right in green was a feared assassin and stickup kid. Robbed Biggie and Faith Evans one night while they were having a romantic dinner. He also used a child as a human shield in a shoot-out and was sent to prison for it. He was murdered shortly after robbing another Bad Boy associate however it is unsure if the incidents are linked as Ben made many enemies due to his quick trigger finger.

Ant Live (crouching behind 50 Cent): Eric B.’s affiliate and was also known to get busy. He passed away in 2016 after a long illness.

Supreme Magnetic (top right) - The leader of the notorious Paid in Full Posse. Stickup kid and was one of the biggest drug dealers in Brooklyn at the time. He allegedly tried stealing Jam Master Jay’s dookie chain and got punched in the face for trying.

Freddie Foxx (not pictured) - Legendary rapper and was meant to originally partner with Eric B however missed the meeting & Rakim took his spot. A goon of the highest order who himself quotes, “my precedence precedes me & I’m not even the livest one in the crew”.

A young Nas used to look up to these guys and the Paid in Full Posse cosigned him right back. The rappers were getting pressed up by alot of drug dealers and these goons provided them with both street credibility and protection from extortion. 30 years later and the influence of these larger-than-life personalities still influence hip-hop. There’s no doubt that you too have been influenced in some way by these legendary originators. Follow Inverse Culture for more hip-hop stories, street fashion & more.

https://inverseculture.com/blogs/featur ... full-posse
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